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Tag Archive for ‘Portland Horror Film Festival’

Mike’s Review: Stag (Portland Horror Film Festival 2022)

Mike’s Review: Stag (Portland Horror Film Festival 2022)

★★★★ out of ★★★★★

We’ve said it before and we’ll say it again — comedy is a difficult task that’s made all the more difficult when it gets mixed up with its gory cousin, HORROR. To see it done well is one of the more pleasant sites that a horror fan gets to ever see. 

The new film, Stag, by quadruple threat (actress, writer, director, and producer) Alexandra Spieth marries these two ugly cousins together perfectly — ironically in the context of a weekend bridal party.

Mike’s Review: What is  Buried Must Remain (Portland Horror Film Festival 2022)

Mike’s Review: What is Buried Must Remain (Portland Horror Film Festival 2022)

★★★.5 out of ★★★★★

There’s a very real chance that this film may be the first of its kind. True story. One of one. The first ever. Well, that might be a little bit of a stretch, but it’s unlikely that there are any other found footage horror films made by Syrian teens who happen to be refugees living Lebanese settlement camps. If there are others out there we’d sure love to know about them.

Mike’s Portland Horror Film Festival Review: Red River Road (2020)

Mike’s Portland Horror Film Festival Review: Red River Road (2020)

★★★★ out of ★★★★★

It’s fair to say that we might not know the full impact of the global pandemic tragedy for years or even decades. Some have been tragically impacted by the pandemic, some have wandered in a face-covered fog, and others have irresponsibly stuck their heads in the sand. Everyone has had choices to make during the pandemic and those choices have manifested in the horrible, but they’ve also been used for creativity and good. 

Mike’s PHFF Review: Uncle Peckerhead (2020)

Mike’s PHFF Review: Uncle Peckerhead (2020)

★★★★ out of ★★★★★ Pulling off a feature length film takes some serious gumption. Pulling off a film that balances impeccable comedic timing, a fully realized soundtrack, empathetic characters, complicated friendships, and a heaping dose of spatter gore — well, that’s a whole different story. Directed by horror short filmmaker Matthew John Lawrence, Uncle Peckerhead hits every single note and simultaneously manages to bang out a gory film that would make Herschell Gordon Lewis blush.